Members & Board

CMPAS works with 12 public power members and affiliates in MN and IA. The Agency is governed by a 12-member board comprised of a representative from each of its member’s cities. Below is a listing of our board members and a profile of their utility.

Board Members

Tim Stoner20190823134637

Tim Stoner

Board President, Blue Earth
Steve Nasby20190823154801

Steve Nasby

Board Member, Windom
Scott Johnson20190823154535

Scott Johnson

Board Member, Springfield
Randy Eggert20190823153936

Randy Eggert

Board Member, Kenyon
Paul Twite20190823152349

Paul Twite

Board Member, Delano
Nate Zimmerman20190823153005

Nate Zimmerman

Board Vice President, Janesville
Nancy Zaworski20190823153726

Nancy Zaworski

Board Member, Kasson
Mike Schulte20190823154126

Mike Schulte

Board Member, Mountain Lake
Joel Grejtak20190823152510

Joel Grejtak

Board Member, Fairfax
Dave Meyer20190823152623

Dave Meyer

Board Member, Glencoe
Crystal Johnson20190823152749

Crystal Johnson

Board Treasurer, Granite Falls
Bob Elston20190823154354

Bob Elston

Board Member, Sleepy Eye

Member Communities

Blue Earth

Blue Earth Light and Water (BELW) is one of forty eight of the nation’s more than 2,000 public power utilities that has earned the Reliable Public Power Provider (RP3)® designation from the American Public Power Association for providing reliable and safe electric service. In planning for its electrification future, BELW installed two electric vehicle (EV) charging stations at the city’s welcome center next to the 55-foot-high statue of the Jolly Green Giant along Interstate Highway 90.

Website: belw.org

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 10.7  MW
Purchased: 8.7 MW


Total 19.44 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 8.74 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.44 MW

6.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Delano

The city, whose slogan is “The Spirit of Community,” is home to the oldest and largest Fourth of July celebration in Minnesota, first held July 4, 1857. In 2013, Forbes selected Delano over every other town in the United States as the “Best School for Your Housing Buck.” Student test scores have consistently been at or near the top in the state.

Website: delanomn.us

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 25.9  MW
Purchased: 10.9 MW


Total 36.8 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 8.5 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.20 MW

6.1
Tons of CO2 offset

Fairfax

Founded at the intersection of Minnesota State Highways 4 and 19, Fairfax calls itself a “Little Big Town”. The city bustles as a transportation hub within Renville County, an agricultural center that produces more corn and soybeans than any other county in Minnesota. Residents and visitors alike enjoy the 8.1-mile hiking and biking trail that connects Fairfax with Historic Fort Ridgely State Park located along the Minnesota River Valley.

Website: fairfax-mn.gov

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 1.8  MW
Purchased: 2.6 MW


Total 4.4 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 2.2 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.01 MW

1.6
Tons of CO2 offset

Glencoe

Glencoe has its eye on its future while also working to preserve its small-town community feel, as shown by the slogan, “Small City. Big Future.” The Glencoe Light and Power Utilities Commission has a long history of using available resources to position itself for the future and is proud to lead the state in purchasing reliable power from a local landfill gas generation plant. Generating electricity from methane is reliable and environmentally friendly, which makes it an attractive resource.

Website: glencoelightandpower.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 39.1  MW
Purchased: 12.9 MW


Total 52 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 9.1 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.16 MW

6.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Granite Falls

Named for the granite and gneiss outcroppings over which the Minnesota River flows, Granite Falls is a great rural community with a strong and diverse economic landscape. The city’s location on the river allows it to generate electricity from a hydroelectric plant. At times, the plant meets approximately 30 percent of the city’s total electric needs with clean electric power.

Website: granitefalls.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 6.7 MW
Purchased: 5.44 MW


Total 13.44 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 6.84 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.5 MW

5.2
Tons of CO2 offset

Janesville

Janesville is a community where friends are like family. “What if your neighbors were your best friends?” the city asked in a YouTube video. Fitting for a city named after Mrs. Jane Sprague, a 19th century settler. The city is located on the south edge of Lake Elysian and is home to Southern Minnesota’s only reversible golf course, where you can play a round either in a counterclockwise route or in a less conventional clockwise one.

Website: janesvillemn.gov/utilities

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 5.2 MW
Purchased: 3.74 MW


Total 8.94 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 3.74 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.021 MW

2.6
Pounds of CO2 offset

Blue Earth

Blue Earth Light and Water (BELW) is one of forty eight of the nation’s more than 2,000 public power utilities that has earned the Reliable Public Power Provider (RP3)® designation from the American Public Power Association for providing reliable and safe electric service. In planning for its electrification future, BELW installed two electric vehicle (EV) charging stations at the city’s welcome center next to the 55-foot-high statue of the Jolly Green Giant along Interstate Highway 90.

Website: belw.org

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 10.7  MW
Purchased: 8.7 MW


Total 19.44 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 8.74 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.44 MW

6.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Delano

The city, whose slogan is “The Spirit of Community,” is home to the oldest and largest Fourth of July celebration in Minnesota, first held July 4, 1857. In 2013, Forbes selected Delano over every other town in the United States as the “Best School for Your Housing Buck.” Student test scores have consistently been at or near the top in the state.

Website: delanomn.us

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 25.9  MW
Purchased: 10.9 MW


Total 36.8 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 8.5 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.20 MW

6.1
Tons of CO2 offset

Fairfax

Founded at the intersection of Minnesota State Highways 4 and 19, Fairfax calls itself a “Little Big Town”. The city bustles as a transportation hub within Renville County, an agricultural center that produces more corn and soybeans than any other county in Minnesota. Residents and visitors alike enjoy the 8.1-mile hiking and biking trail that connects Fairfax with Historic Fort Ridgely State Park located along the Minnesota River Valley.

Website: fairfax-mn.gov

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 1.8  MW
Purchased: 2.6 MW


Total 4.4 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 2.2 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.01 MW

1.6
Tons of CO2 offset

Glencoe

Glencoe has its eye on its future while also working to preserve its small-town community feel, as shown by the slogan, “Small City. Big Future.” The Glencoe Light and Power Utilities Commission has a long history of using available resources to position itself for the future and is proud to lead the state in purchasing reliable power from a local landfill gas generation plant. Generating electricity from methane is reliable and environmentally friendly, which makes it an attractive resource.

Website: glencoelightandpower.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 39.1  MW
Purchased: 12.9 MW


Total 52 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 9.1 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.16 MW

6.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Granite Falls

Named for the granite and gneiss outcroppings over which the Minnesota River flows, Granite Falls is a great rural community with a strong and diverse economic landscape. The city’s location on the river allows it to generate electricity from a hydroelectric plant. At times, the plant meets approximately 30 percent of the city’s total electric needs with clean electric power.

Website: granitefalls.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 6.7 MW
Purchased: 5.44 MW


Total 13.44 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 6.84 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.5 MW

5.2
Tons of CO2 offset

Janesville

Janesville is a community where friends are like family. “What if your neighbors were your best friends?” the city asked in a YouTube video. Fitting for a city named after Mrs. Jane Sprague, a 19th century settler. The city is located on the south edge of Lake Elysian and is home to Southern Minnesota’s only reversible golf course, where you can play a round either in a counterclockwise route or in a less conventional clockwise one.

Website: janesvillemn.gov/utilities

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 5.2 MW
Purchased: 3.74 MW


Total 8.94 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 3.74 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.021 MW

2.6
Pounds of CO2 offset

Kasson

Kasson’s 1895 86-foot ornamental water tower of gray limestone is on the National Register of Historic Places. Providing quality utility services, including electricity, has been ingrained into the community fabric since the city’s beginnings.

Website: cityofkasson.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Purchased: 11.34 MW


Total 11.34 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 11.34 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.7 MW

8.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Kenyon

Home of the Boulevard of Roses and the historic Gunderson House, Kenyon is ideally nestled along the north fork of the Zumbro River 40 miles northwest of Rochester and only 50 miles south of downtown St. Paul. Its locale allows Kenyon to offer small-town charm in a family-friendly community, with a convenient, easy commute to suburban and metropolitan areas.

Website: kenyonmn.govoffice3.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 5.54 MW
Purchased: 5.5 MW


Total 11.04 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 4.94 MW

3.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Mountain Lake

Mountain Lake’s tribute to its public power heritage is strongly apparent in the photos that line the walls as you walk through its power plant. In fact, in the late 1920’s when the citizens voted to form a public power utility, the area IOU contested the election and took the city to court. Ultimately, the Minnesota Supreme Court upheld the lower court opinion “that the election was hotly contested, but fairly conducted. And the results should be left in force.” And so, public power was born in Mountain Lake.

Website: mountainlakemn.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 9.2  MW
Purchased: 18.7 MW


Total 27.9 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 5.1 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.04 MW

3.6
Tons of CO2 offset

Sleepy Eye

Sleepy Eye citizens in the 1890’s were so concerned about keeping students comfortable for learning that they located the city’s first power plant in the basement of the new public school. Located in the middle of Minnesota’s most productive farmland, many of Sleepy Eye’s businesses, including vegetable canning, serve the agricultural sector. State Highway 14, also known in Minnesota as the Laura Ingalls Wilder Historic Highway, goes through the center of Sleepy Eye and is the avenue used to send food to market.

Website: sleepyeye-mn.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 11.68  MW
Purchased: 29.1 MW


Total 40.7 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 10.7 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.04 MW

7.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Springfield

Springfield often refers to itself as “Minnesota Town on the Prairie” in keeping with the city’s mention on the “Little House on the Prairie” television show based on the famous Laura Ingalls Wilder’s books. The quality of life improved for the “Minnesota Town on the Prairie” when it built a power plant in 1894. At the time, only a few hundred kilowatt hours of electricity were generated per day – mostly for lighting. Today, 125 years later, the city’s quality of life is phenomenal as Springfield Public Utilities reliably meets electric needs.

Website: springfieldmn.org

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 9.1 MW
Purchased: 7.8 MW


Total 16.9 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 6.5 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.04 MW

4.6
Tons of CO2 offset

Windom

You can “Come On Down” to Windom anytime, especially given that it is the birthplace of Johnny Olson, the original announcer on the Price is Right game show. Windom is a lively, growing city, as viewed in the video, “Windom a Great Place to Live!”. A transportation hub for the region, Windom is served by U.S. Highway 71 and Minnesota Highway 60. The city’s public power utility electrifies a diverse economy including manufacturing, agriculture, medical and adult care facilities.

Website: windom-mn.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 9  MW
Purchased: 15.6 MW


Total 24.6 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 9.3 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.07 MW

6.6
Tons of CO2 offset

Kasson

Kasson’s 1895 86-foot ornamental water tower of gray limestone is on the National Register of Historic Places. Providing quality utility services, including electricity, has been ingrained into the community fabric since the city’s beginnings.

Website: cityofkasson.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Purchased: 11.34 MW


Total 11.34 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 11.34 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.7 MW

8.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Kenyon

Home of the Boulevard of Roses and the historic Gunderson House, Kenyon is ideally nestled along the north fork of the Zumbro River 40 miles northwest of Rochester and only 50 miles south of downtown St. Paul. Its locale allows Kenyon to offer small-town charm in a family-friendly community, with a convenient, easy commute to suburban and metropolitan areas.

Website: kenyonmn.govoffice3.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 5.54 MW
Purchased: 5.5 MW


Total 11.04 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 4.94 MW

3.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Mountain Lake

Mountain Lake’s tribute to its public power heritage is strongly apparent in the photos that line the walls as you walk through its power plant. In fact, in the late 1920’s when the citizens voted to form a public power utility, the area IOU contested the election and took the city to court. Ultimately, the Minnesota Supreme Court upheld the lower court opinion “that the election was hotly contested, but fairly conducted. And the results should be left in force.” And so, public power was born in Mountain Lake.

Website: mountainlakemn.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 9.2  MW
Purchased: 18.7 MW


Total 27.9 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 5.1 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.04 MW

3.6
Tons of CO2 offset

Sleepy Eye

Sleepy Eye citizens in the 1890’s were so concerned about keeping students comfortable for learning that they located the city’s first power plant in the basement of the new public school. Located in the middle of Minnesota’s most productive farmland, many of Sleepy Eye’s businesses, including vegetable canning, serve the agricultural sector. State Highway 14, also known in Minnesota as the Laura Ingalls Wilder Historic Highway, goes through the center of Sleepy Eye and is the avenue used to send food to market.

Website: sleepyeye-mn.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 11.68  MW
Purchased: 29.1 MW


Total 40.7 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 10.7 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.04 MW

7.5
Tons of CO2 offset

Springfield

Springfield often refers to itself as “Minnesota Town on the Prairie” in keeping with the city’s mention on the “Little House on the Prairie” television show based on the famous Laura Ingalls Wilder’s books. The quality of life improved for the “Minnesota Town on the Prairie” when it built a power plant in 1894. At the time, only a few hundred kilowatt hours of electricity were generated per day – mostly for lighting. Today, 125 years later, the city’s quality of life is phenomenal as Springfield Public Utilities reliably meets electric needs.

Website: springfieldmn.org

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 9.1 MW
Purchased: 7.8 MW


Total 16.9 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 6.5 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.04 MW

4.6
Tons of CO2 offset

Windom

You can “Come On Down” to Windom anytime, especially given that it is the birthplace of Johnny Olson, the original announcer on the Price is Right game show. Windom is a lively, growing city, as viewed in the video, “Windom a Great Place to Live!”. A transportation hub for the region, Windom is served by U.S. Highway 71 and Minnesota Highway 60. The city’s public power utility electrifies a diverse economy including manufacturing, agriculture, medical and adult care facilities.

Website: windom-mn.com

Energy Profile

Power Generation:

Local Energy: 9  MW
Purchased: 15.6 MW


Total 24.6 MW

Sustainable Energy:

Carbon Free Energy: 9.3 MW

 Energy Savings: 0.07 MW

6.6
Tons of CO2 offset